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The Gist of Yojana: February 2015


The Gist of Yojana: February 2015


Why Do Indian Firms Go Abroad ?

In recent years, India and China have not only liberalised their FDI regimes, but also emerged as investors abroad. Although, the volume of India’s investments is much lower than that of China, the composition of India’s FDI, centered on manufactures and services, its heavy presence in the developed countries, its method of entry into foreign markets based on acquisitions principally the UK and the US, sets it apart from the other emerging economy investors.

Size and Pattern of India’s Investments Abroad

The total stock of India’s FDI increased from a meagre $124 million in the year 1990 to $ 111,257 million in 2011 with a share of 3 per cent in the total Overseas Direct Investment (ODI) stock of the developing countries. India’s ODI is significantly different from that of China in its composition-whereas a large proportion of China’s investments is in oil and raw materials, India’s investments are in manufacturing and services.
Third, more than 50 per cent of India’s ODI is in the developed economies while more than 75 per cent of China’s ODI is in the developing economies.

By the end of the year 2008, India was the second largest investor in the UK, next only to the US.

Fourthly, the growth of India’s ODI is mostly through acquisitions. In the year ending in August 2010, India was second in the list of the ten most acquisitive nations, with a share of 24 per cent of cross-border M&A transactions originating from emerging economies.

The latest tests of the OLI theory relate to ODI from India and China (Pradhan 2011, Buckley et.al, 2007; Kumar, 2007 & Nunnenkamp et.al, 2010). The pioneering studies relating to India are those by Jayaprakash Pradhan who has (2008,2011, 2004). painstakingly put together a set of data from a number of sources including the media and unpublished data from government sources.

Selected Articles from Various News Paper: Civil Services Mentor Magazine - February 2015


Selected Articles from Various Newspapers & Journals


Development as a people’s movement

Development was a key issue in the 2014 Lok Sabha election. In his very first speech after taking over as Prime Minister, Narendra Modi asserted that his government is committed to carrying on development as a people’s movement. This, he has asserted, will draw upon India’s democratic, demographic and demand dividends. But are we genuinely moving towards organising development as a people’s movement while building on these strengths? To cater to India’s massive population of consumers, people should have adequate purchasing power, such as that enjoyed by people employed in the industries or services sector. Unfortunately, as the malnourishment statistics indicate, a vast majority of Indians are poor, with barely 10 per cent employed in the organised sector. We are being convinced that vigorous economic growth is generating substantial employment. But this is not so.

When our economy was growing at 3 per cent per year, employment in the organised sector was growing at 2 per cent per year. As the economy began to grow at 7-8 per cent per year, the rate of growth of employment in the organised sector actually declined to 1 per cent per year since most of the economic growth was based on technological progress, including automation. At the same time, the increasing pressure of the organised sector on land, water, forest and mineral resources has adversely impacted employment in farming, animal husbandry and fisheries sectors. People who are being pushed out of these occupations are now crowding in urban centres. This is in turn leading to a decline in the productivity of the organised industries and services sector. Evidently, the ship of our development is sadly adrift.

Undoubtedly, people aspire for development. But what is development? Joseph Stiglitz, a recipient of the Nobel Prize in Economics and one-time chairman of Bill Clinton’s Economic Advisory Council, offers an insightful analysis, asserting that development should result in an enhancement of the totality of a nation’s four-fold capital stocks: the capital of material goods, natural capital such as soil, water, forests and fish, human capital including health, education and employment, and social capital comprising mutual trust and social harmony. Our current pattern of economic development is by no means a balanced process resulting in the overall enhancement of the totality of these stocks.

Thus, for instance, mining in Goa has severely damaged the State’s water resources and caused high levels of air and water pollution. The ever-increasing content of metals in drinking water reservoirs has adversely impacted health. When thousands of trucks were plying ore on the roads of Goa, the resulting chaos in traffic and accidents seriously disrupted social harmony. Evidently, the single-minded focus on industrial growth is not leading to sustainable, harmonious development, but merely nurturing a money-centred violent economy.

In Chandrapur and Gadchiroli districts of Maharashtra, both of which are Naxal-torn, there are hopeful examples emerging of how development may be nurtured as a people’s movement. A number of tribal and other traditional forest-dwelling communities of these districts now have management rights over Community Forest Resources under the Forest Rights Act. The state retains ownership over such resources, and these cannot be diverted to other purposes. But now these resources are being managed holistically with a fuller involvement of the people. The citizens of Pachgaon, for instance, have, through two full-day meetings of their entire Gram Sabha, decided upon 40-odd regulations. Tendu leaves are a major forest produce, but their harvest entails extensive lopping and setting of forest fires.

Regional Rural Banks: Civil Services Mentor Magazine - February - 2015


Regional Rural Banks


Majority of Indian population reside in rural areas but they have very few formal channels of money supply. Due to reliance on informal channel of money like money lenders, rural population faces high hardship. Over the time government has created few formal channels of finance especially for the rural area. Regional rural banks are one of the most important channels of money supply in rural India. The Banking Commission (1972) recommended for a particular institution for rural credit system and finally Government of India established Regional Rural Banks as a separate institution for rural credit. Regional Rural Banks (RRBs) were established in 1975 under the provisions of the Regional Rural Banks Act, 1976. They were formed with some specific objectives like;

  • Develop the rural economy and to create a supplementary channel to the ‘Cooperative Credit Structure’.
  • To enlarge institutional credit for the rural and agriculture sector.
  • The RRBs mobilise deposits primarily from rural/semi urban areas.
  • Provide loans and advances mostly to small and marginal farmers, agricultural labourers, rural artisans and other segments of priority sector.

(Final Result) UPSC: Central Armed Police Forces (Asstt. Commandants) Examination, 2014

Union Public Service Commission

(Final Result) Central Armed Police Forces (Asstt. Commandants) Examination, 2014

Based on the results of the Central Armed Police Forces (Assistant Commandants) Examination, 2014 held by UNION PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION on 13th July, 2014 and the interviews for Personality Test
held in February, 2015, the following is the list, in order of merit, of candidates who have been recommended for appointment to the posts of Assistant Commandants (Group A) in the Central Armed Police Forces viz. Border Security Force (BSF), Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF), Sashastra Seema Bal (SSB) & Central Industrial Security Force (CISF).

2. A total number of 105 candidates have been recommended for appointment as per the following break-up:-

GENERAL

OBC

SC

ST

Total

50 31 16 08 105

(Answer Keys) UPSC: CDS Examination (I) 2014

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Union Public Service Commission

(Answer Keys) CDS Examination (I) 2014

Exam Name: CDS Examination (I) 2014

Subject: General Knowledge + English + Elementary Mathematics

Year: 2014

(Download) UPSC GDMO, MO Gr-II & Doctor Gr-II Exam Paper

UPSC

Union Public Service Commission

(Download) UPSC GDMO, MO Gr-II & Doctor Gr-II Exam Paper

1. Which one of the following infections is mainly responsible for recurrent exacerbation of COAD in elderly?

(a) Rota virus
(b) Mycobacterium tuberculosis
(c) Staphylococcus aureus
(d) Haemophilus influenza

2. The following diseases have autosomal dominant inheritance except :

(a) Polycystic kidney disease
(b) Peutz Jegher syndrome
(c) Phenylketonuria
(d) Von Willebrand disease

3. A young female presents with right heart failure. On examination she has an elevated JVP with giant a wave, systolic murmur at left sternal border, soft delayed P2 with an ejection sound. The ECG shows right ventricular hypertrophy. She is likely to have:

(a) Pulmonary stenosis
(b) Tricuspid regurgitation
(c) Atrial septal defect
(d) Ventricular septal defect

4. Nocturnal hypoxaemia in COPD is due to all the following except:

(a) An increase in upper airway resistance because of muscle tone
(b) Stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors
(c) Shallow breathing in REM sleep, reduced ventilation
(d) Inhibition of intercostals and accessory muscles in REM sleep

5. A 50 year old male presented with acute onset dyspnoea, orthopnoea and pinkish frothy sputum. The clinical diagnosis is:

(a) Acute bronchial asthma
(b) Acute pulmonary oedema
(c) Acute pulmonary embolism
(d) Pneumonia

6. Pseudo membranous colitis is caused by which of the following organisms?

(a) Shigella
(b) E. coli
(c) Clostridium perfringens
(d) Clostridium difficile

7. The ventricular tachycardia can respond to all of the following except:

(a) D C Cardioversion
(b) I.V. Amiodarone
(c) I.V. Lidocaine
(d) I.V. Digitalis

(Download) UPSC Assistant Architect Exam Paper

UPSC

Union Public Service Commission

(Download) UPSC Assistant Architect Exam Paper

1. A screen, usually of louvers, placed on the outside of a building to shield the windows from direct sunlight is

(a) Drum wall
(b) Solarium
(c) Brise-soleil
(d) Trombe-wall

2. A vertical diaphragm acting as a thin, deep cantilever beam in transferring lateral loads to the foundation is

(a) Pneumatic structure
(b) Shell
(c) Membrane
(d) Shear wall

3. A glass unit consisting of two or more sheets of glass separated by a hermetically sealed air space, to provide thermal insulation and restrict condensation is

(a) Reflective glass
(b) Heat-absorbing glass
(c) Low emissivity (low-E) glass
(d) Insulating glass

4. ‘Sky Component’ is an element of

(a) Earthquake resistant design
(b) Daylight factor
(c) Rainwater harvesting
(d) Thermal performance analysis

5. Architectural design today need not address

(a) Climatic considerations
(b) Energy efficiency
(c) Stylistic affiliations
(d) User response

Cyberspace: Civil Services Mentor Magazine - February - 2015


Cyberspace


Cyberspace word was introduced by William Gibson in Cotton and Oliver. It is defined as “A consensual hallucination experienced daily by billions of legitimate operators, in every nation, by children being taught mathematical concepts… A graphic representation of data abstracted from the banks of every computer in the human system. Lines of light ranged in the nonspace of the mind, clusters and constellations of data. Like city lights, receding..” In simple terms it can be defined as “the notional environment in which communication over computer networks occurs.” Cyberspace serves as a platform for people to interact, share ideas and aspirations, play games, engage in political discussion and so on inexpensively. It has broken down the barriers between the peoples and nations.

Once things happening in a country or a small city used to be confined to that particular city or country and hardly known to others for a quiet long time. But now the scenario has totally changed with the news spreading within a blink of eye. Text messages were used to organize massive protests which ultimately became orange revolution which lead up to 2004 presidential elections in Ukraine. In 2005 in Lebanon, e-mail and text messaging were used by activists to coordinate and bring a million demonstrators into the streets to demand that the Syrian government end nearly three decades of military presence in Lebanon by withdrawing its 14,000 troops. Result of 2009 Iran presidential elections flooded not only the streets of Iran with protesters but internet, twitter opposing the election results. Egypt spring 2012 gained its momentum through the aid of cyberspace. This role played by social media in Egypt revolution has been applauded across the world as success of cyberspace in bringing active civic participation, mobilizing popular protest for democracy. In all these protests cyberspace was used as a bridge to bring people, their ideas together and provide much needed space for communication.

Is cyberspace a new place for protest? Are these protests for peace or for terror. Many terrorist and extremist organizations utilize cyberspace for spreading its own agenda. ISIS flooding internet with video clips of its brutal acts and people closely following these videos and photos as a kind of reality show is contributing as a great deal to the organization’s popularity. A few Indian youth inspired by these left India to join ISIS. A software engineer based in Bangalore with fake twitter account used to gather information about ISIS and translate from Arabic to English and post it on internet. Cyberspace is slowly turning to a cyber warfare. In order to counter the threat which Cyber space poses government has designed a cyber security policy main features of the policy are:-

Bharat Ratna Award: Civil Services Mentor Magazine - February - 2015


Bharat Ratna Award


Throughout the history of India, we have seen lot of exceptionally brave and talented persons who have graced the Indian soil. Bharat Ratna Award is one medium to provide proper recognition to the sacrifices and talents of those individuals. Bharat Ratna is a highest civilian award which a person can recieve in India. There is no restriction of awarding the award only to citizen and in past foreigners have also recieved this award. The provision of Bharat Ratna was introduced in 1954. Chandrasekhara Venkata Raman was the first ever Indian to be graced by this highest award. Since then various internationally and nationally recognized personalities have received this award. Important personalities who have received this award are C Rajagopalachari (awardee: 1954), CV Raman (awardee: 1954), S Radhakrishnan (awardee: 1954,), Bhagwan Das (awardee: 1955), Visvessaraya (awardee: 1955), Govind Ballabh Pant (awardee: 1957), DK Karve (awardee: 1958), BC Roy (awardee: 19612), Purshottam Das Tandon (awardee: 1961), Rajendra Prasad (awardee: 1962), Zakir Hussain (awardee: 1963) and PV Kane (awardee: 1963). This award is given for exceptional service towards advancement of Art, Literature and Science, and in recognition of Public Service of the highest order. Certain criteria’s are followed for this award:-

Gist of The Hindu: February 2015


Gist of The Hindu: February 2015


Development as a people’s movement

Development was a key issue in the 2014 Lok Sabha election. In his very first speech after taking over as Prime Minister, Narendra Modi asserted that his government is committed to carrying on development as a people’s movement. This, he has asserted, will draw upon India’s democratic, demographic and demand dividends. But are we genuinely moving towards organising development as a people’s movement while building on these strengths? To cater to India’s massive population of consumers, people should have adequate purchasing power, such as that enjoyed by people employed in the industries or services sector. Unfortunately, as the malnourishment statistics indicate, a vast majority of Indians are poor, with barely 10 per cent employed in the organised sector. We are being convinced that vigorous economic growth is generating substantial employment. But this is not so.

When our economy was growing at 3 per cent per year, employment in the organised sector was growing at 2 per cent per year. As the economy began to grow at 7-8 per cent per year, the rate of growth of employment in the organised sector actually declined to 1 per cent per year since most of the economic growth was based on technological progress, including automation. At the same time, the increasing pressure of the organised sector on land, water, forest and mineral resources has adversely impacted employment in farming, animal husbandry and fisheries sectors. People who are being pushed out of these occupations are now crowding in urban centres. This is in turn leading to a decline in the productivity of the organised industries and services sector. Evidently, the ship of our development is sadly adrift.

Undoubtedly, people aspire for development. But what is development? Joseph Stiglitz, a recipient of the Nobel Prize in Economics and one-time chairman of Bill Clinton’s Economic Advisory Council, offers an insightful analysis, asserting that development should result in an enhancement of the totality of a nation’s four-fold capital stocks: the capital of material goods, natural capital such as soil, water, forests and fish, human capital including health, education and employment, and social capital comprising mutual trust and social harmony. Our current pattern of economic development is by no means a balanced process resulting in the overall enhancement of the totality of these stocks.

Thus, for instance, mining in Goa has severely damaged the State’s water resources and caused high levels of air and water pollution. The ever-increasing content of metals in drinking water reservoirs has adversely impacted health. When thousands of trucks were plying ore on the roads of Goa, the resulting chaos in traffic and accidents seriously disrupted social harmony. Evidently, the single-minded focus on industrial growth is not leading to sustainable, harmonious development, but merely nurturing a money-centred violent economy.

Insurance Sector in India: Civil Services Mentor Magazine - February - 2015


Insurance Sector in India


Insurance sector is one the most important financial intermediary in India. This sector helps in mobilizing savings of general public to financial assets. Insurance sector also act as a stabilizer and it helps people in the situation of crisis. Insurance penetration is very low in India; it is well below the standards of U.S.A. Before liberalization Public sector insurance companies had the monopoly over the market. Due to lot of private sector Company’s entry post liberalization number of people with insurance cover have improved significantly but it still fall below the satisfactory levels. Indian insurance sector at present has 52 companies. Insurance sector can be broadly divide into two sectors; life insurance and non-life insurance sector. Out of these 52 companies 24 are working in life insurance sector and 28 are working in non-life sector. Private sector entry in insurance sector was allowed in 1999. Before that sector had only public sector players like life insurance cooperation, General insurance cooperation etc.

Reforms of 1999 in insurance sector can be divided as following:-

  • Opening of sector for private companies.
  • Foreign direct investment up to 26 percent was allowed in this sector.
  • Insurance regulatory and development authority was created to regulate and develop this sector.

Swachh Bharat Mission: Civil Services Mentor Magazine - February - 2015


SWACHH BHARAT MISSION


Throughout the world around 2.5 billion people do not have toilets to use, out of those 250 crore people 65 crore live in India alone. In order to solve this big challenge government of India has launched “Swachh Bharat Mission” on the birth anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi and former Prime Minister Lal Bahadur Shastri. Due to magnanimity of the problem solving it will not be easy. Government has to face the problems associated with extremely poor hygienic conditions and most significantly government has to fight with attitude towards cleanliness. Poor sanitation is linked to various social as well as economic factors like extreme poverty, educational level, religious affiliation and society which does not challenge the unclean behavior but there are some infrastructural challenges as well like lack of toilets, availability of pit and flush. Effort of “Swachh Bharat Mission” is two dimensional, one from the government agencies and other from the non-governmental organizations. Government intention is to increase the peer pressure and make India “open defecation free” by 2019. Sanitation problem has serious implications on the health. Poor sanitation results to high rate of morbidity and mortality with in India. Poor sanitation is also responsible for lot of diseases like cholera, typhoid, pneumonia, worm infection etc. Sanitation in India can be divided in to two groups of urban sanitation and rural sanitation. At the level of urban area three major schemes are run by the central government for the improvement of sanitation.

(Notification) UPSC: IES / ISS Examination, 2015

Union Public Service Commission

Indian Economic Service/Indian Statistical Service Examination, 2015

No. 12/4/2014-EI(B): A combined competitive examination for recruitment to Junior Time Scale of the Services mentioned in Para 2 below will be held by the Union Public Service Commission commencing from 23rd May, 2015 in accordance with the Rules published by the Ministry of Statistics & Programme Implementation in the Gazette of India dated the 17th August, 2013.

Eligibility Conditions :

(I) Nationality

A candidate must be either :— (a) A citizen of India, or
(b) a subject of Nepal, or
(c) a subject of Bhutan, or
(d) a Tibetan refugee who came over to India before 1st January, 1962 with the intention of permanently settling in India, or
(e) a person of Indian origin who has migrated from Pakistan, Burma, Srilanka or East African countries of Kenya, Uganda, the United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia, Malawi, Zaire and Ethiopia or from Vietnam with the intention of permanently settling in India. Provided that a candidate belonging to categories (b), (c), (d) and (e) above shall be a person in whose favour a certificate of eligibility has been issued by the Government of India.

Education Qualification:

A candidate for the Indian Economic Service must have obtained a post Graduate Degree in Economics/Applied Economics/ Business Economics/ Econometrics from a University incorporated by an Act of the Central or State Legislature in India or other educational Institutes established by an Act of Parliament or declared to be deemed as University under Section 3 of the University Grants commission Act, 1956 or a Foreign University approved by the Central Government from time to time. (b) A candidate for the Indian Statistical Service must have obtained a Bechelor's Degree with Statistics/Mathematical Statistics/Applied Statistics as one of the
subject or a Master's degree in Statistics/Mathematical Statistics/ Applied Statistics from a University incorporated by an Act of the Central or State Legislature in India or other Educational Institutes established by an Act of Parliament or declared to be deemed as University under Section 3 of the University Grants commission Act, 1956 or a Foreign University approved by the Central government from time to time

(Free E-book) Weekly Current Affairs Update for IAS Exam VOL - 36 (04th August 2014 TO 10th August 2014)


Weekly Current Affairs Update for IAS Exam

VOL - 36 (04th August 2014 TO 10th August 2014)


Issue : VOL - 36 (04th August 2014 TO 10th August 2014)

File Type: PDF ONLY "NO HARD COPY"

Covered Topics:

  • Ministry of External affairs

  • Planning Commission of India

  • National

  • International

  • Economy

  • Sports

  • In The News

  • Science and Technology

  • Selected Editorials of Importance

(Download) Civil Services Mentor Magazine, February 2015 - FREE PDF

Free Digital Magazine: Civil Services Mentor, February 2015

Issue : February 2015
Size: 5.44 MB
File Type: PDF
Publisher : IASEXAMPORTAL.COM 

Table of Contents:

Articles:

  • Swachh Bharat Mission
  • Insurance Sector In India
  • Bharat Ratna Award
  • Cyberspace
  • Regional Rural Banks
  • Selected Articles from Various Newspapers & Journals
  • Special Study Material (The Mauryan Empire)
  • Model Paper G.S. Paper I

Current Affairs:

  • National Issues
  • International Issues
  • Economy
  • India & The World
  • Science & Technology
  • Sports
  • Awards & Prizes
  • Persons in News

(Final Result) UPSC Indian Forest Service Examination (IFoS), 2014

Union Public Service Commission

(Final Result) Indian Forest Service Examination, 2014

Based on the results of the Indian Forest Service (Main) Examination 2014 held by Union Public Service Commission in Nov-Dec, 2014 followed by Personality Test held in February, 2015, the following is the list, in order of merit, of candidates who have been recommended for appointment to posts in Indian Forest Service.

2. The number of candidates recommended for appointment under different categories are as under :

GENERAL

OBC

SC

ST

TOTAL

32 ( including 02 PH-2 & 01 PH-3 candidates ) 34 13 06 85 ( including 02 PH-2 & 01 PH-3 candidates )

(Download) UPSC SCRA Exam Paper, 2015 "Mathematics (Paper -3)"

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Union Public Service Commission

(Download) Special Class Railway Apprentices Exam Paper, 2015

Subject: Mathematics

Paper: III

Year: 2015

(Download) UPSC SCRA Exam Paper, 2015 "Physical Sciences (Paper -2)"

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Union Public Service Commission

(Download) Special Class Railway Apprentices Exam Paper, 2015

Subject: Physical Sciences

Paper: II

Year: 2015

(Download) UPSC SCRA Exam Paper, 2015 "General Ability Test (Paper -1)"

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Union Public Service Commission

(Download) Special Class Railway Apprentices Exam Paper, 2015

Subject: General Ability Test

Paper: I

Year: 2015

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