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(Getting Started) How To Study Maps for UPSC IAS Exams



(Getting Started) How To Study Maps for UPSC IAS Exams



Maps are an important part of your preparation for prelims as well as mains examination. Depending on your choice of optional, it may prove to be important there as well. Many aspirants feel burdened and distressed by the need to study maps. However, with the right strategy and understanding, it is not at all a difficult task.

  1. Start With The Neighbours

India is a large country with various physical and political boundaries within it. However, owing to our long coastline, we share borders with just a few countries. To not overwhelm yourself, start studying maps by studying the neighbors we have in each direction. Follow it up with the oceans on each side and the islands/land masses we have on those oceans.

  1. Latitudes and Longitudes

Check out which important lines pass through India and which of its states. Also, check out which lie in the tropics and subtropics. Questions are often framed from this area.

  1. States

Now look inwards. Check out all states and their neighbors. Know all the important cities of each state. Mark any city or town that has been in news recently. Know the industries each state holds. Also, note any international boundary a state may share with another country.

Download Maps PDF for UPSC Exams

  1. Rivers

Note down the important rivers in the country and which states they pass through. Know the main rivers and their tributaries. Also, have a basic understanding of water-sharing between states/with neighboring countries. Note down important dams and power generation bodies on rivers.

  1. Lakes

Lakes are important spots of biodiversity and integral to the environment section of your UPSC syllabus. Note famous lakes across the country and their features. 

  1. Mountains

India is bordered by the Himalayas in the North and has many more hills across the country. These are important from a security and environmental point of view. Know the highest peaks of every range, the flora, and fauna unique to them, tribes that might inhabit these ranges. Also, know the glaciers which are a source for perennial rivers.

  1. Natural Resources

India is rich in vegetation covers as well as minerals. Know the sites for different minerals and other excavations in the country and the ones off-shore. Note the different types of vegetation covers and the weather in those areas that give them their uniqueness.

  1. National Parks and Biospheres

These have become some favorite topics for UPSC to ask. Know all National parks in the country as well areas deemed protected under different environmental acts. Especially note those that have been in the news.

  1. World

Although UPSC focuses mainly on India, it is important to know the unique regions across the world such as deserts, biosphere hubs, unique rivers, etc.

  1. Places In News

And finally, keep an eye out for places that are mentioned in news articles, whether in India or around the world, as UPSC tends to frame questions from these sections. 

All these should cover your map preparation completely without anything left behind.

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(Download) NCERT Book For Class VII : Geography (Our Environment)

(Download) NCERT Book For Class VII : Geography

Table of Content

  • Chapter 1 Environment
  • Chapter 2 Inside Our Earth
  • Chapter 3 Our Changing Earth
  • Chapter 4 Air
  • Chapter 5 Water
  • Chapter 6 Natural Vegetation and Wildlife
  • Chapter 7 Human Environment–Settlement, Transport and Communication
  • Chapter 8 Human Environment Interactions The Tropical and the Subtropical Region
  • Chapter 9 Life in the Temperate Grasslands
  • Chapter 10 Life in the Deserts

(Getting Started) A Time-tested 2-year Strategy For Cracking UPSC Exams



(Getting Started) A Time-tested 2-year Strategy For Cracking UPSC Exams



How to prepare for UPSC exams | Deccan Herald

UPSC Civil Services Examination remains the entry gate to one of the most prestigious lines of services in the country. Every year lakhs of students appear for it and many more start dreaming of cracking this exam. Many myths are surrounding this examination but the only truth any aspirant needs to keep in mind is this – with hard work, a few smart choices, and the right strategy, anyone can crack this exam.

Ideally, for an average aspirant, 18-24 months is the ideal time frame needed to prepare for this examination seriously and find a good rank. Keeping this in mind, here is a full-proof strategy that if followed with the right determination and dedication, you should be able to find your name in the final list.

Week 1 

Learn The UPSC Syllabus By Heart

Take a print out of the UPSC detailed syllabus. Start mugging up the topics as your life depends on it. It is a bit lengthy and difficult to grasp. Take a week at the very beginning of your preparation and just memorize it word for word. Always keep a copy of the syllabus handy throughout your journey.

Weeks 2 and 3

Understanding Sources, Pattern, and Strategy

Look up topper interviews. Take advice, frame your preparation strategy. Formulate a book list. Download the last 10 years of prelims and mains papers. Familiarize yourself with the kind of questions asked, connect it to the syllabus topics, and just, in general, understand the pattern.

Week 4

Shortlist Your Optional

By now, you are well versed in the world of UPSC. It is time to take another very important step which is choosing your optional. You have heard toppers talk about their experiences, you have read up on the subjects and topics covered in those subjects. Now depending on your interest and expertise, choose the option you want to pursue. Make a source list as well.

Months 2-5

NCERTs First Read

NCERTs are the government approved text sources and thus integral to any government exam you take. The usual recommendation is to study all NCERT Books for subjects included in the UPSC syllabus from classes 6 to 12. However, depending on your expertise on the matter, you may choose to only study higher class NCERTs. But if you are indeed taking the long 2-year route into your attempt, you have the time for it; we recommend giving it all a read.

Months 6-10

Text Books First Read, Answer Writing Practice

You have your finalized booklist. You are done with the basics through NCERTs. Now it is time to study the detailed subjects through subject books. Read them slowly and thoroughly. Commit them to memory. This is also the right time to pick up answer writing. Spend 2 hours each day writing at least 2 to 3 general studies answers. Try to write at least one Ethics answer and one Essay topic each week.

Months 11-16

Optional Preparation, General Studies Second Read and Notes making

This is the right time to start on your optional. Optional requires mastery over the subject and thus a very thorough preparation. Spread out the topics and ensure you do due research. Meanwhile, revise your NCERTs and main textbooks and make notes. Study Notes should be short and crisp i.e. a page of information from a textbook should not be jotted down into more than 2-3 sentences and a chapter should not take more than one page at best. 

Months 17-20

General Studies Mains Test Series, Optional Second Read, and Notes Making

This is the right time to take up a mains test series. You can revise your notes and take the tests while also reading through your optional material again and making notes from the same. Use your test analysis to better your writing and preparation. Try to solve previous years’ questions for your option if you get time.

Months 21-24

Exclusive UPSC Prelims Preparation

Now is the time to sort your notes for material exclusively important for prelims. Take at least 30 mock tests at this time to maximize your chances of crossing prelims. The last 4 months before prelims should exclusively be for your prelims preparation. Once you appear for it and are assured selection, you can go back to your mains related preparation.

Pro Tip: Make Newspaper Reading A Morning Routine

Current affairs have found great value in UPSC prelims and mains over the past years. Make reading newspapers a daily habit and make notes daily. 

Use monthly compilations from online sources for revision. Hopefully, with such a detailed approach, you will soon find yourself in the company of your future colleagues in Mussoorie.

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(Download) NCERT Book For Class VII : Medieval Indian History

(Download) NCERT Book For Class VII : Medieval Indian History

Table of Content

  • Tracing Changes Through A Thousand Years
  •  New Kings And Kingdoms
  •  The Delhi Sultans
  •  The Mughal Empire
  •  Rulers And Buildings
  •  Towns, Traders And Craftspersons
  •  Tribes, Nomads And Settled Communities
  •  Devotional Paths To The Divine
  •  The Making Of Regional Cultures
  •  Eighteenth-Century Political Formations

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(Getting Started) How to Score 161 Marks in UPSC Essay by AIR-51 Vikram Grewal



(Getting Started) How to Score 161 Marks in UPSC Essay by AIR-51 Vikram Grewal



Vikram Grewal is a topper in UPSC Civil Services Examination in the year 2018. He is one of the highest rank holders at an all-India rank of 51 as well as a very high scorer in the UPSC Mains Essay paper which he claims is one of the larger contributors in his rank. He is a History graduate from St. Stephen’s College, Delhi. Vikram has his eyes set on UPSC from when he was a teenager in school. In 2018, his dream finally came true.

Vikram’s Strategy

Vikram divided his essays into 2 parts 

  • part 1 was content and 
  • part 2 was the presentation. 

He believes both are equally important. He paid more attention to presentation as he believed content is rich for most serious candidates already.

Preparation

Whenever you come across a topic in your day to day studies, note it down and think for a few minutes what you may write if that were your essay topic. Originality is key. Consider your essay to be a conversation with the examiner and develop that perspective. He did not practice any essay a few weeks preceding the exam so that he could approach the topics with a fresh mindset. Vikram even suggests downloading a Chrome extension that suggests quotes by famous people every time you open a new window to use in your essays.

Presentation

Vikram believes one of his weak points is his handwriting. Which is why he focused on spacing out his sentences. He wrote 2 paragraphs per page and a total of 20 paragraphs for each topic, which is roughly 1000 to 1200 words. Each paragraph should end on the same page. At least 2 keywords or references must be in each paragraph.

ESSAY STRATEGY BY ESSAY TOPPER: Chandra Mohan Garg, Rank 25, Essay Marks  149, CSE 2015 - INSIGHTSIAS

One Way To Structure Your Essay

Planning

The main part is planning in the first 15-20 minutes. He would read the topic, take 15 minutes to think up the content and break it up into 20 points, and then write for an hour to an hour and a half each. Each point was broken down into a paragraph and each paragraph talked of something new. 

Essay Study Kit for UPSC IAS Mains Exam

(Download) NCERT Book For Class VII : Science

(Download) NCERT Book For Class VII : Science

Table of Content

  • Nutrition in Plants
  • Nutrition in Animals
  • Fibre to Fabric
  • Heat
  • Acids, Bases and Salts
  • Physical and Chemical Changes
  • Weather, Climate and Adaptations of Animals to Climate
  • Winds, Storms and Cyclones
  • Soil
  • Respiration in Organisms
  • Transportation in Animals and Plants
  • Reproduction in Plants

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(Getting Started) UPSC Prelims Strategy by Chirag Jain AIR-160



(Getting Started) UPSC Prelims Strategy by Chirag Jain AIR-160



Chirag Jain is one of the toppers of the prestigious UPSC Civil Services Examination of 2019. He is a  native of Bharatpur, Rajasthan, and a Mechanical Engineer from the National Institute of Technology, Jaipur. 2019 was his 3rd attempt. To date, he has cleared all his prelims attempts, moving on to the interview stage twice. He has also worked in Tata Motors, Pune before finally achieving his long set dream of becoming a Civil Servant. Currently, he is training as an Indian Police Service officer with the U.P. cadre.

Study Sources

Like most toppers over the years, Chirag is a firm believer in the practice of “minimum sources, maximum revision”. He kept his sources simple and tried to revise them as many times as he could manage. Here is a list of his subject wise sources –

Notes-making

Other than Laxmikanth, Chirag prepared notes for all other subjects. For Laxmikanth he highlighted the important parts. Especially for Current Affairs, Chirag made notes specific to prelims requirements after his second round of revision. 

The trick to understanding what to write in your notes; it is important to solve Previous Years’ Papers. Once you get the hang of it, you will understand clearly what to include in your notes and what to leave behind. You DO NOT want to INCLUDE UNNECESSARY DETAILS in your notes.

10 TIPS TO MAKE EXCELLENT NOTES FOR UPSC - Crack UPSC

Revision

Revision is key to success in UPSC Civil Services Exams, and even more so in the prelims stage. Chirag was devoted to multiple revisions. He ensured that he revised the static portion at least 4 times. This ensured that any question that was asked from material he has read, he was able to answer correctly. He kept revising the evolving current affairs along the way as well.

Test Series Practice

Chirag had solved 2 test series. For his first attempt, he had taken 60+ mocks, 30+ for his second attempt; however, in this attempt, he only had time for some 10 mock tests. But he strongly recommends solving as many as you can.

Hindi–Tips to Fill OMR Sheet| Engineering

While attempting the paper, keep in mind the job is not just checking scores. The more important part is analyzing your strengths and weaknesses. This way, you can improve on the topics you are unable to answer properly while revising the ones you are already good at. Mocks also allow you to judge your accuracy properly. This will allow you to decide your number of attempts.

Chirag used to analyze his mocks twice. The first time, he would identify the topics he answered correctly. In his second iteration, he would mark the topics he got wrong and go back to revising them. During the test, he would mark the topics he did not know about, and immediately afterward, he would ensure he read up on them. This also helped his revision.

Exam Attempts

The first thing Chirag suggests doing is going through the paper, answering all the questions you know accurate answers to. In all his 3 attempts, Chirag has never crossed the 55 question mark on this iteration. In the same iteration, he would also mark the ones he had half-knowledge of.

This was followed by another parsing of the paper, this time using elimination techniques. On those that he marked for the later attempt, he would eliminate 2 options, and in the remaining 2, use his intuition and make an informed guess.

Also, DO NOT LEAVE MARKING THE OMR SHEET FOR THE END. If you run out of time and cannot mark answers, you will lose out on the exam.

Message To IAS Aspirants

UPSC wants govt to remove mandatory aptitude test from civil service exam

Do not give up. Many have only cleared their prelims at the 5th and final attempt and made it through to the final list. 

Keep trying and you will succeed. Best of luck!

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(Getting Started) Essay Writing in UPSC - The Do's and Don'ts



(Getting Started) Essay Writing in UPSC - The Do's and Don'ts



“I write to find out what I think.”
– Stephen King, American Author

This quote is the first thing you need to keep in mind when preparing for your UPSC Civil Services Mains Exam Essay paper. Only by writing will you ever learn how to score well in this paper. In this article, we will discuss the basic steps you need to follow to write good essays.

Understanding What UPSC Wants From Your Essay

“Candidates may be required to write essays on multiple topics. They will be expected to keep closely to the subject of the essay, to arrange their ideas in an orderly fashion, and to write concisely. Credit will be given for effective and exact expression.”

This is directly picked from what UPSC mentions in its syllabus. The main difference between GS and Essay is in the fact that in GS, you are awarded marks on content alone. For essay, grammar, coherence, language, and presentation is key.

A good starting place is looking at previous years' question papers. They give you an idea of the kind of topics UPSC expects you to write about.

Do's

  1. Vocabulary and Grammar

Grammatically correct sentences, with correct spellings, along with better than average vocabulary will give you an edge over the competition. Work on developing these skills from day one.

  1. Subheadings

Subheadings not only make your answer more readable; it helps keep your essay fluid. Unlike in GS, your subheadings must not be titles of your segment, but try and be a little more creative. For example, using 'The Disadvantages Of Social Media' does the job in GS. But in essays, something like 'The Perils Of Social Media' will fetch you brownie points.

  1. Coherence

Keep a flow to your answer. One segment shouldn't appear random after another. Allow the last line of your last paragraph to be a link for the first line of your next paragraph, making the whole essay coherent.

UPSC Mains Essay Papers Download 

  1. Interesting Introduction

You are used to writing either definitions or facts as introductions in GS papers. For essays, you need to make an extra effort. You can start with a relevant quote by a famous personality or either a real-life or fictitious story that adds to the arguments you are about to make.

  1. Substantial Arguments In Body

There should be valid facts and statistics backing your arguments. Remember your opinion does not hold any value till valid arguments are backing it. Use conclusions drawn in government reports or reports by qualified bodies and experts, draw statistics from reports published. They will elevate your answer.

  1. Futuristic and Optimistic Conclusion

And finally, leave the examiner hopeful with your conclusion. Present solutions. You can quote speeches by the prime minister or other government officials and plans and commissions in the process.

Don'ts

  • Focus on multiple dimensions. Do not go overboard on a single dimension or point. All points require similar attention.
  • Remember, what you feel is irrelevant. Only what you can argue with facts is important. Keep opinions that cannot be substantiated to yourself.
  • Do not select topics you were not comfortable writing when practicing. You will not get magically good at it during the exam.
  • Avoid extremes. Even if you have a good point, taking an extreme or unpopular opinion can do more harm than good.
  • Do not dedicate too long a time to one essay that you fall short on the other.

Follow these tips and surely with the right amount of practice, you'll score impressively well in your Essay paper. All the best!

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(Getting Started) Complete Guide To Approaching PSIR Optional



(Getting Started) Complete Guide To Approaching PSIR Optional



Each year lakhs of aspirants sit for the Civil Services Examination conducted by UPSC. Only a few make it to the final list. The mains stage is the stage that makes and breaks one's attempt and largely decides your rank. The total marks covered in the mains stage is 1750, and out of it, the optional paper alone covers 500 marks in its 2 papers, each of 250 marks. Whereas the average score of successful aspirants in general studies papers ranges between 40-50%, one can score up to 70% in their optionals. Therein lies the importance of your optional.

UPSC 2016 Mark sheets of IAS Toppers with Political Science as optional. -  xaam.in

PSIR can be very scoring

Why Choose Political Science and International Relations (PSIR) Optional?

Once you identify your interest in the subject, Political Science and International Relations is an excellent choice of optional for the following reasons –

  • The upsc syllabus covers a chunk of the prelims and mains general studies syllabus. Around 60% of the syllabus of this optional directly or indirectly overlaps with your general studies syllabus.
  • The syllabus is not vague and easy to follow.
  • It's a relatively straight forward subject and can be grasped by even those who don't have a humanities background.
  • It's an added advantage for a bureaucrat to be familiar with the concepts.

Basic Content

Booklist for PSIR

Paper-I

Section-A

  1. Political Theory – Meaning and approaches – Shubhra Ranjan Notes
  2. Theories of State – OP Gauba Political Theory and Shubhra Ranjan Notes
  3. Justice – Andrew Heywood Political Theory and Shubhra Ranjan Notes and Yale's Youtube Channel (Rawl's Theory of Justice)
  4. Equality – OP Gauba, Boxes in Andrew Heywood, Shubhra Ranjan Notes
  5. Rights – Shubhra Ranjan Notes 
  6. Democracy - OP Gauba, Boxes in Andrew Heywood, Shubhra Ranjan Notes
  7. Concepts – POWER from Shubhra Ranjan Notes, HEGEMONY in GRAMSCI, IDEOLOGIES from Andrew Heywood, LEGITIMACY from Shubhra Ranjan Notes, and IGNOU Notes
  8. Political Ideologies – Andrew Heywood Political Ideologies
  9. Western and Indian Thinkers – Shubhra Ranjan Notes and IGNOU Notes

Section-B

  1. Indian Nationalism – Spectrum Modern India
  2. Perspectives on Indian Nationalism – Shubhra Ranjan Notes
  3. Making of Indian Constitution – Laxmikanth
  4. Salient Features of the Indian Constitution – Laxmikanth
  5. Principle Organs – Internet
  6. Grassroots Democracy – Laxmikanth
  7. Statutory Institutions – Laxmikanth
  8. Federalism – Laxmikanth
  9. Planning and Economic Development – NCERT Indian Economic Development
  10. Caste, Religion, Ethnicity – Shubhra Ranjan Notes
  11. Party System – Shubhra Ranjan Notes
  12. Social Movements – Shubhra Ranjan Notes

Getting Started) PSIR Optional Strategy By Simi Karan AIR-31 | IAS EXAM  PORTAL - India's Largest Community for UPSC Exam Aspirants.

Paper-II

Section-A

  1. Comparative Politics – Shubhra Ranjan Notes
  2. Globalization – Shubhra Ranjan Notes and Andrew Heywood
  3. Approaches to IR – World Politics by Owen and Smith, Shubhra Ranjan Notes
  4. Key IR Concepts – Andrew Heywood, Subhra Ranjan Notes
  5. Changing International Political Order – World Politics Class XII NCERT, Shubhra Ranjan Notes
  6. Evolutions of International Economic System – Andrew Heywood, Shubhra Ranjan Notes
  7. United Nations – Shubhra Ranjan Notes, Andrew Heywood
  8. Regionalization of World Politics – Shubhra Ranjan Notes
  9. Contemporary Global Concerns – Andrew Heywood, Subhra Ranjan Notes

Section B

  1. India's Foreign Policy – Subhra Ranjan Notes
  2. India's Contribution to NAM – Shubhra Ranjan Notes
  3. India and South Asia – Shubhra Ranjan Notes
  4. India and Global Centres of Power – Shubhra Ranjan Notes, David Malone's Does The Elephant Dance

Current Affairs

Keep an eye out for news covering India's relation to the world, global conferences, MoUs, etc. Read editorials by writers like Suhasini Haider, Hussain Haqqani, Pratap Bhanu Mehta, etc. 

Timeline

Have all your initial studying and preparing notes completed by December. After prelims, concentrate on revision. Attempt one or two answers every day. Keep practicing, go through previous years' questions multiple times and you'll be all set. Don't get frustrated if it goes slower than expected; it's only normal. 

Keep trying and you'll score your best. All the best!

 

When diplomacy ends, War begins. Adolf Hitler

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Current Public Administration Magazine (MAY 2021)


Sample Material of Current Public Administration Magazine


1. Accountability and Responsibility

  • Why universities should consider UGC’s proposal to recognise NCC

On April 15, the University Grants Commission (UGC) forwarded for consideration to all vice-chancellors of universities across India a proposal of the Directorate General, National Cadet Corps (NCC), aimed at including NCC as an elective subject in curricula. If this is implemented, NCC will become a part of the Choice-Based Credit System (CBCS) envisioned in the National Education Policy (NEP) 2020. It will permit students enrolled as NCC cadets to receive academic credits for NCC training, and avail employment incentives offered under various central and state government schemes.

NCC is the world’s largest uniformed youth volunteer organisation. With a footprint covering thousands of educational institutions across the country, it has a better gender ratio than any other uniformed organisation in the country with girl cadets accounting for one-third of the total. As in the Indian armed forces, the NCC’s army wing dwarfs the navy and air force wings in terms of numbers.

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2. Indian Government and Politics

  • Judiciary must uphold rights of citizens without sacrificing sobriety

The recent judgment of the Supreme Court in the Election Commission of India case is an example of judicial statesmanship. During the hearing of a matter, the Madras High Court felt that in the state elections, the EC had failed to enforce Covid safety guidelines, resulting in the spread of the pandemic. Oral observations from the bench stated that the “EC is the institution that is singularly responsible for the second wave of Covid-19” and “EC should be put up for murder charges”. This was widely reported in the media. 

The EC approached the SC. The SC has beautifully dissolved the conflict between EC and the HC, avoiding a positive pronouncement either way. However, the SC has done what it wanted to do.
The judgment protects the media’s right to report accurately the court’s proceedings even if not made a part of the record; it has also recorded an appreciation of the performance of the EC and nullified the effect of oral observations stating that “observations during the course of hearing do not constitute a judgment or binding decision”.

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3. Social Administration

  • Moving towards universal vaccination

On January 5, the the BBC published an article titled “Covaxin: What was the rush to approve India’s homegrown vaccine?” This was just after the Drug Controller General of India (DCGI) had approved Covaxin and Covishield through a restricted Emergency Use Authorisation (EUA) against COVID-19 on January 3.

The DCGI approval was based on the recommendation of the Subject Expert Committee of the Central Drugs Standard Control Organization (CDSCO).

The article went on to quote a prominent Member of Parliament from the opposition and a minister in the erstwhile UPA government who stated that the approval for Covaxin was given due to “the chest-thumping ‘vaccine nationalism’ — combined with the PM’s ‘self-reliant India campaigning’, [that] trumped common sense and a generation of established scientific protocols.”

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4. Current Topic

  • Why the Supreme Court order on school fee relief misses the big picture

The Supreme Court judgment in Indian School Jodhpur v State of Rajasthan (May 3, 2021) dealt with a set of appeals concerning the validity of a circular issued by the Director of Secondary Education, State of Rajasthan. This circular reduced school fees for the academic year 2020-21 for schools affiliated with the Central Board of Secondary Education by 30 per cent, and for schools affiliated with the Rajasthan Board of Secondary Education by 40 per cent.

The reduction was commensurate to the reduction in the syllabus, and aimed to provide some respite to parents who may be dealing with the economic fallout of the Covid-19 pandemic.

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4. Current Topic

  • National Archives of India

The National Archives of India (NAI) complex is slated for major changes under the Central Vista Project. Conflicting reports indicate that the heritage structure that is part of the National Archives complex will be retained but that additions to the original plot will be demolished later in the project. The lack of clarity around the plans for preservation, transfer and access of these national records is a cause for concern. While the Minister of Culture stated on Thursday that the government will “continue to keep the records safely,” his statement focuses on the retention of the heritage building, and does not mention the demolition of the Annexe building, which reportedly houses several public records, private papers, departmental records etc. This further highlights the need for public scrutiny.

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5.  Indian Administration

  • Unfair to the Election Commission

On April 26, the Chief Justice of the Madras High Court (MHC) made extremely disconcerting remarks against the Election Commission of India (ECI), attributing the ongoing spread of Covid-19 to the ECI’s alleged mismanagement and inaction in the conduct of elections. The MHC orally remarked that the ECI is “singularly responsible for the second wave of Covid-19” and it “should be put up for murder charges”. What is more disconcerting is that these disparaging remarks were not recorded in the order, so it is unclear exactly which state the Bench was referring to. This aspect assumes importance because the spread of Covid-19 in Tamil Nadu was under control when the elections were announced. It also assumes importance in light of the legal position that high courts do not have extraterritorial jurisdiction. Thus, any observations not relatable to events unfolding in Tamil Nadu would violate well-settled principles of judicial propriety and overreach.

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Current Public Administration Magazine (APRIL 2021)


Sample Material of Current Public Administration Magazine


1. Accountability and Responsibility

  • When Central government hides behind the ‘system’

I have been desperately seeking your address to send these musings for your kind consideration and necessary perusal but nobody could say with certainty where you live. So, I chose the only alternative I could think of and that is to make an appeal to you so that you unmask yourself.

Of late, we have been hearing this refrain from various quarters that “the system has failed”, “the system has collapsed”, and that “the system” is to be blamed for the unprecedented pain and misery and loss of thousands of Indian lives. We have seen how the data about cases of infection are managed across states. We have also witnessed — helplessly — the wide gap between the numbers of deaths declared through the “system” and the bodies burning at the crematoriums. And then, we also have seen hundreds of bodies floating through different river streams — brazenly denied by the “system”. Article 21 of the Indian Constitution, which underlines the right to life, is gathering dust. So are scores of other issues relating to constitutional morality. The blatant arrogance of the most important people behind the fiction of the “system” during the Covid pandemic, particularly the second wave, shows that institutions of accountable and representative government have been turned into objects in a museum.

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2. Indian Government and Politics

  • The UP governance model needs to be challenged 

Uttar Pradesh has the population the size of Brazil, and 80 LokSabha seats. But the nature of its potential dominance in Indian politics is not simply a function of size and demography. The national influence of UP politics is magnified when it is part of the hegemonic national dispensation, as it is currently. It is no accident that fear of UP domination abated when it was governed by local parties like the SP or BSP. But beyond party alignment, the nature of the political imagination driving UP politics also matters a great deal; the demographic dominance is magnified if it is aligned to an ideological project and a governance style that seeks to be nationally dominant.

We often speak loosely of the politics of the “Hindi heartland”. This might make sense as a crude contrast with the “South”. But this is a misnomer. There is the obvious fact that the nature of development and the social basis of politics in states like Rajasthan, UP, Bihar and MP is quite diverse. Conflating them is about as analytically useful as conflating Karnataka and Tamil Nadu. Amongst these states, what makes UP a special challenge is that its ideological influence on national politics is pervasive in a way that is not quite true of the other states. With the ascent of Yogi Adityanath in UP, this ideological configuration is coming into shape in a starkly chilling form that has great implications for national politics.

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3. Social Administration

  • Development with Beloning

Owing to the COVID-19 pandemic and the general global slowdown, unemployment has become a major concern worldwide. The state of Haryana, too, has been unable to escape the wrath of this economic crisis. However, as the world‘s economies struggle to bounce back, Haryana has been taking steady strides towards change and development.

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4. Current Topic

  • Hunger Crisis In India

The second wave is a “top-up” crisis. With millions of families already in deep distress due to the first wave, we must look beyond the issue of oxygen and pay attention to abject hunger among the millions of people in the country.

Let’s start with the unfolding disaster, and contrast it to March and April of 2020. Last year, lack of food and rations was the big visible crisis. But this visibility was limited to migrants whom we could see and till the time they were in the larger cities, we were able to provide them food. As soon as they moved 100 km away, and even further into villages, they were out of our radar. As soon as they became invisible, their needs were largely ignored by governments, agencies and the media.

CLICK HERE FOR FULL ARTICLE (Only for Course Members)

4. Current Topic

  • National Archives of India

The National Archives of India (NAI) complex is slated for major changes under the Central Vista Project. Conflicting reports indicate that the heritage structure that is part of the National Archives complex will be retained but that additions to the original plot will be demolished later in the project. The lack of clarity around the plans for preservation, transfer and access of these national records is a cause for concern. While the Minister of Culture stated on Thursday that the government will “continue to keep the records safely,” his statement focuses on the retention of the heritage building, and does not mention the demolition of the Annexe building, which reportedly houses several public records, private papers, departmental records etc. This further highlights the need for public scrutiny.

CLICK HERE FOR FULL ARTICLE (Only for Course Members)

5.  Indian Administration

  • Why citizen-led fact-finding missions have a role in democracy  

The solicitor-general of India challenged five fact-finding reports conducted on the riots in Northeast Delhi in 2020 in the Delhi High Court on February 24. He argued that the citizen groups, which conducted the fact-finding, were examples of a self-constituted, extra-constitutional, “parallel judicial system”, that did not have any authority in law. They could not be relied upon by any formal judicial forum. He said that people cannot have their own fact-finding committees, they must go to a competent authority.

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Study Materials For Public Administration

Online Coaching For Public Administration

(Getting Started) UPSC Prelims Strategy by IAS Shrestha Anupam AIR-19



(Getting Started) UPSC Prelims Strategy by IAS Shrestha Anupam AIR-19



Shreshtha Anupam of Bhagalpur, Bihar, ranked 19 in UPSC Civil Services 2019. He is a Chemical Engineer with a B.Tech degree from Delhi University. He had previously attempted the upsc exam as a college student but did not get far. This was his second attempt and he reached the very top.

Bhagalpur's Shrestha Anupam bags AIR 19 in UPSC exam, studied 10-15 hours  daily | Hindustan Times

Shreshtha Anupam, AIR-19, UPSC CSE 2019

6 Pillars Of UPSC Success

According to Shreshtha, there are 6 subjects that are the pillars of success in UPSC prelims. They are –

  1. Modern History
  2. Polity
  3. Economy
  4. Geography
  5. Environment
  6. Current Affairs

Conceptual clarity and in-depth knowledge in these subjects will ensure you can answer the prelims questions to the best of your abilities

UPSC Prelims Strategy

Solving Mock Tests

The key to success in prelims is practice. The recent trends in UPSC make it impossible for one to know all answers for sure. In the exam hall, at least 40-60 marks can be acquired by simply eliminating options to reach the correct answer. Solving test papers allow you to have enough practice of eliminating options that you can use in the exam hall. Shreshtha solved at least 50 papers for his prelims attempt.

Graduate Aptitude Psychometric Tests | Types of Testing

OMRs are non-replaceable. Practice helps.

Current Affairs

Reading newspapers is a must according to Shreshtha. Monthly magazines, daily blogs, and YouTube videos help you. However, there is no alternative to the perspective developed by reading newspapers on your own and forming your opinions. It helps you immensely with conceptual clarity which carries you through the prelims, mains, and even the interview stage. 

Static Subjects 

Some key points to note here –

  • Your aim is to score a 100% in Polity and Economy. If you have studied Laxmikanth for polity and Mrunal (online source) for Economics with multiple revisions, this is easily achievable because the questions asked on these subjects in UPSC prelims are conceptual and within the bound of these two sources.
  • Even though UPSC asks some very deep questions in Modern History from time to time, if you have covered your sources well, you should be able to score at least 70-80% on this portion. The more the merrier.
  • For Art and Culture, which is intrinsically tied to Ancient and Medieval History, refer to RS Sharma and Satish Chandra Old NCERTs. For Art and Culture, refer to the Fine Arts NCERT and read selectively from Nitin Singhania. The syllabus is huge for this portion, but the questions asked are few. So, use your better judgment when preparing.
  • For geography, maps are key. For the last 2 months before the prelims, please ensure you dedicate 10-15 minutes to map practice daily. The sources suggested by Shreshtha for this section is the NCERT books of classes 11 and 12.

How to practice maps for UPSC CSE - Quora

Map Practice Is Important

  • For the environment, refer to Shankar IAS. It is enough and supplements it with previous years' questions. Each year, at least 20-22 questions are asked from this section and you can easily answer them with a little effort.

Message To Aspirants

The preliminary exam is a deciding factor. Out of 7/8 lakh aspirants, only 10 thousand get selected. You want to ensure you are on the right side of this 1:10 ratio. Know your accuracy and attempt accordingly. 

Keep working hard; hard-workers never fail in their quests.

All the best!

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(Getting Started) Self Study Strategy by IAS Sanjita Mohapatra AIR-10



(Getting Started) Self Study Strategy by IAS Sanjita Mohapatra AIR-10



Sanjita Mohapatra is the 10th all-India rank holder in UPSC Civil Services Examination 2019. She is a native of Rourkela, Odisha. A mechanical engineer who has served as an assistant manager for Rourkela Steel Plant, she quit her job in 2018. In 2019 she has finally bagged her dream job of being an IAS officer. She attributes her success in this exam to self-studying, as well as to her choice of optional Sociology. This was Sanjita's 5th attempt. She has previously secured a state rank of 2 in Odisha Public Services Commission.

Sanjita's Booklist

To begin with, Sanjita shares the books she had picked up on her journey.

Mistakes She Learned From

Sanjita had qualified upsc prelims once before and was able to identify the problems in the first 3 times that she did not qualify. The key is multiple revisions and mock test practice. Without it, nobody can qualify for prelims.

Similarly, for upsc mains, crisp and short notes making is key. Too long notes are difficult to revise and hence useless. Sanjita learned from her mistakes and for the first time, she did not qualify mains, but ranked 10 among lakhs of aspirants.

UPSC Prelims

Sanjita insists revision is key to cracking prelims. For 2 months before the prelims exam, she quit answer writing and focused full-time on mocks. She reread the NCERT Books and other basic books repeatedly and took to writing online quizzes twice a week.

UPSC Mains

Sanjita made short notes from current affairs. She maintained separate notebooks for each GS paper and maintained bookmarks and clips from online sources as well. Her goal was to ensure that whenever she did sit to revise her notes, she should not have to struggle with resources.

She also took a 3 months crash course and last-minute current affairs revision classes before her mains. Study Notes from those classes greatly aided her preparation.

Answer Writing

She answered in bullet points and used two separate inks for headings and text. This helped her make her answers more readable. And the practice helped her with presentation skills.

Attempting All Answers

Out of the 80 odd questions asked in UPSC Mains General Studies papers, Sanjita had answered 78 which is big deal. She timed her practice so that even in the exam hall, she could finish the 10 10 markers in an hour and take the rest hour and a half to complete the remaining 15 markers. Then focus the next half an hour on ensuring you did it all write.

Message To IAS Aspirants

Patience, Perseverance, Consistency, and Hard Work – these are the 4 qualities that set a successful UPSC aspirant apart from the rest. 

Stay focused and do your best. May you be showered with success.

All the best!

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(Getting Started) How to Score 310 Marks In Philosophy - K Aman Chandran (AIR-197)



(Getting Started) How to Score 310 Marks In Philosophy - K Aman Chandran (AIR-197)



K Aman Chandran is a Kerala native who has secured a coveted all-India rank of 197 in the UPSC Civil Services Examination. He has done his schooling at Vyasa Vidya Peethom, Kallekkad, Palakkad, and he graduated with an Electrical and Electronics Engineering B.Tech degree from College of Engineering, Trivandrum. This was his second attempt after 2018.

Vidya Bharati alumni from Kerala, K Aman Chandran, who successfully cleared  Civil Service Examination talks about his journey | VB Portal

K Aman Chandran, AIR-197, UPSC CSE, 2019

Why Choose Philosophy Optional?

Choosing an optional is one of the most important decisions one has to make during their Civil Service Preparation. Aman considers aptitude to be the most important factor while choosing an optional. To begin with, Aman had an amateur interest in Philosophy.

Also, the syllabus of Philosophy optional is short and static. That makes it very manageable. Philosophy also provides you an edge in the Essay and Ethics papers. But mainly, Aman chose Philosophy for the intellectual stimulation it has to offer.

Strategy For Philosophy Paper-I

There are two sections in Paper-I – Indian and Western Philosophies. The similarities and differences between each school of thought and how they are comparable to each other are the main takeaways from this section. For example, what Adi Shankaracharya is to Indian Philosophy, Kant is to Western.

Paper-I is very concept-oriented and what is expected of you is to learn how their opinions are justified by their arguments and their implications. The questions of world view and morality are important and the criticism is faced. The key to paper-I is mastery over the content.

Getting Started) AIR-112 Sizal Agarwal's Strategy For Philosophy Optional |  IAS EXAM PORTAL - India's Largest Community for UPSC Exam Aspirants.

Paper-I Book List

Good study notes are very very important to score well in this. Aman had his notes from Mahesh Sir's class which had content curated from many books and other source material. This helped him save a lot of time.

Strategy For Philosophy Paper-II

There are two sections here as well – sociopolitical philosophy and the philosophy of religion. Sociopolitical is more contemporary such as democracy, justice, equality, multiculturalism, etc. Scholars like John Ralphs, Gandhi, Amartya Sen, Ambedkar, etc. Concepts of Marxism, Socialism, etc. come in. In the philosophy of religion, interpretation plays a role. The concept of God, the relation between religion and morality is questioned.

Paper-II is more about the originality of thought than content. How well you can create, process and present ideas are what plays the key role here. Approach questions with your independent opinion and justify those opinions.

Philosophy Optional Printed Study Materials for UPSC Mains

DOWNLOAD 10 YEARS UPSC MAINS PHILOSOPHY PAPERS PDF

How To Maximize Your Optional Score

The strategy for Aman was simple –

  • For paper-I, he concentrated on learning concepts, arguments, justifications, and criticism. There was no place for ambiguity and vague thoughts.
  • For paper-II, Aman developed his skill of original thinking by practicing previous year's questions. Using real-life examples will add value to your answer and increase your marks.
  • Answer writing has to be practiced. Address all sides, talk about only what is asked, and do not go into tangents. Make your answers as readable as possible. Answer with different dimensions such as justification, world view, criticism, etc.

How Philosophy Optional Helped Mold Your Thoughts

भगवान बुद्ध का मध्यम मार्ग | Middle Path of Buddha - YouTube

Balance is key to cracking this exam

Philosophy makes thinkers out of you. It is a very gratifying experience to study so many different ideas and find relations to your day-to-day life. For example, Madhyam Marg philosophy of Buddhism will help every Civil Servant aspirant to understand how to balance their life with preparation. 

It is a process of self-discovery and Aman recommends it to any aspirant who wishes to not only score well in UPSC but also learn and grow alongside it.

 All the best!

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(Getting Started) UPSC IAS (Pre) Exam Books List - Suggested Reading 



(Getting Started) UPSC IAS (Pre) Exam Books List - Suggested Reading 



The UPSC Civil Services Preliminary Examination is a Multiple Choice Based exam held every year by the Union Public Service Commission to filter through the lakhs of aspirants who apply for the coveted Civil Services job posts. Out of the 5/6 lakhs that appear, only around 10 thousand qualify to sit for the upsc mains examination. Although the preparation for prelims and mains leverages the same sources, there are certain distinctions. 

In this article, we cover the comprehensive list of books and study materials that aspirants need to cover exclusively for prelims along with the Amazon links you can use to buy those books.

1.History

Ancient India

Old NCERT – Class 11th ‘Ancient India’ R.S. Sharma

Click Here To Buy

New NCERT – Class 12th ‘Themes In Indian History- Part I’ – Chapters 1 To 6

Click Here To Buy

Tamil Nadu Edition – Class 11th

Click Here To Buy

Medieval India

Book

Link

New NCERT – Class 7th–‘Our Pasts –II’

Click Here To Buy

Old NCERT – Class 11th ‘Medieval India’–Satish Chandra(Selective Reading)

Click Here To Buy

Tamil NaduEdition–Class 11th

Click Here To Buy

Modern India

Book

Link

A Brief History Of Modern India- Spectrum Publications

Click Here To Buy

India’s Struggle For Independence – Bipan Chandra (Selective Reading)

Click Here To Buy

Old NCERT By Bipan Chandra (Selective Reading For The Period 1700s To 1857)

Click Here To Buy

 2.Science

Book

Link

NCERT Class 9 Science

Click Here To Buy

NCERT Class 10 Science

Click Here To Buy

3.Geography

Book

Link

Fundamentals Of Physical Geography XI NCERT

Click Here To Buy

India: Physical Environment XI NCERT

Click Here To Buy

Fundamentals Of Human Geography XII NCERT

Click HereTo Buy

India: People And Economy XII NCERT

Click Here To Buy

Certificate Physical And Human Geography By GC Leong(Selective Chapters)

Click Here To Buy

Business women signature at document Free Photo

4.Polity

Book

Link

Indian Polity By M Laxmikanth

Click Here To Buy

 

5.Economics

Book

Link

Indian Economic Development – NCERT XI

Click Here To Buy

Macroeconomics – NCERT XII

Click Here To Buy

Indian Economy By Ramesh Singh

Click Here To Buy

6.Environment

Book

Link

Environment By Shankar

Click Here To Buy

7.Current Affairs

  • For current affairs, newspapers play an important role. 
  • Given the dynamic nature of the subject, no one book can help you.

SOURCES

One Newspaper such as the Hindu, India Express, etc.

monthly magazine from IAS Exam Portal, etc.

Internet spaces such as PIB, Youtube videos on news, etc.

Although the list is specifically made with the pre exam in mind, these are extremely useful sources for building up your knowledge for your mains. The list is comprehensive, but not exhaustive. When it comes to Civil Services, there is hardly an end to learning. However, if to crack the prelims is your goal today, this list should have you fairly covered and ready to fulfill your IAS dreams.

BEST OF LUCK.

UPSC, IAS, Civil Services Exams - Printed Study Material

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(E-Book) KURUKSHETRA MAGAZINE HINDI PDF - MAY 2021

 (E-Book) KURUKSHETRA MAGAZINE PDF - MAY 2021 (HINDI)

  • Medium: Hindi
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  • Total Pages: 56
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(Getting Started) 10 Qualities Of A UPSC Topper



(Getting Started) 10 Qualities Of A UPSC Topper



One of the toughest and most prestigious examinations conducted in this country, UPSC Civil Services is a dream for so many of the country’s youth. Aspirants who succeed in breaking into these coveted services are put on a pedestal. And they are every bit deserving. UPSC Civil Service toppers join India’s bureaucracy and help push the country into the future. Over the years, a visible pattern has emerged and can be observed in successful candidates across the years. These are qualities that we all aspire to cultivate. 

Here are the top 10 qualities seen in a UPSC topper that all aspirants should persevere to inculcating –

  1. Discipline

This is the first and foremost quality, the bare minimum one needs to crack UPSC. Without discipline, this examination cannot be conquered. Being able to develop studious habits, a regular schedule, the ability to follow a routine and achieve both short-term and long-term goals is what one needs to succeed in UPSC Civil Services. This is also a quality highly expected of our civil servants.

  1. Perseverance

Only a handful ever make it to the final list on their very first try. It is not a matter of capability if we are being logical. The upsc syllabus is vast, the trend ever changing. The exam in itself is very different from any students take in their school or college years. Understanding the ask of the examination takes time. Having the will to keep trying and not get bogged down by failure is very important.

  1. Dedication

UPSC needs dedicated preparation. Studying on and off on a whim will never push you forward. Being dedicated to your efforts is important and it is a quality that is non-negotiable in every UPSC aspirant.

  1. Focus

There are a lot of distractions day to day life presents to you. Especially in today’s digital age, outside of our personal lives, we are constantly collected to the pulse of the entire world. These are distractions one cannot afford if they are to successfully navigate the maze of the UPSC Civil Services Exam. A focussed approach towards the final goal is essential to success in this examination.

  1. Time Management

Other than a vast syllabus, an optional which needs in-depth understanding, and the need to be updated on every relevant national and global news item, UPSC also required one to develop skills such as writing, analytical ability, maintaining a lack of bias, etc. To support all of these activities successfully, one must know how to manage their available time.

  1. Analytical Mindset

UPSC does not just deal with facts. What you conclude from those facts is what is even more important. The ability to logically reason and deduce information from data is a highly appreciated skill that all civil servants must cultivate.

  1. Unorthodox Ideas

The world will not make progress if inventions aren’t made. Inventive ideas are the core of a developed nation and UPSC expects its aspirants to come up with solutions for problems that are yet to be solved. Out of the box, ideation is one of those qualities that UPSC toppers must have.

  1. Decisiveness

Bureaucrats need to take immediate action all the time. Taking decisions at a moment's notice that have a long-lasting impact is a part of the job description. UPSC sets its examination in a manner that this skill in aspirants is tested.

  1. Communication Skills

No matter how well you know your subjects, unless you can convey that to the examiner or the interviewer, there is no way for them to judge you to your true potential. Developing both written and oral communication skills is thus indispensable for all those who wish to crack this exam.

  1. Voracious Curiosity

And finally, unless you are relentlessly curious, the chances of you doing well in this examination is very low. The syllabus is designed to be endless and the questions are set to test your thirst for knowledge. More importantly, you will not enjoy the journey itself if you are not moved by curiosity to learn more. 

So stay curious, develop these essential skills, and very soon your name too will shine bright on that elusive final list.

BEST OF LUCK.

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Public Administration Mains 2020 : Solved Paper-2 (Question: 3)



Public Administration Mains 2020 : Solved Paper Question Paper-2 (Question-3)



Section A

  • Exam Name: UPSC IAS Mains Public Administration (Paper-II)
  • Marks: 250
  • Time Allowed: 3 Hours

Q3.(a) Does the privatization of key public sector bodies augur well for welfarism in India? Discuss with suitable illustrations. (Paid) 

ANSWER: ONLY FOR COURSE MEMBERS

(b) The spirit of democratic values requires that the independence of judiciary remains absolute. It is high time that the All India Judicial Service (AIJS) was created. Elaborate. (Free)

The promotion of good governance through judiciary depends on its independence to a great extent. An independent, unbiased and able judiciary is the first requirement of justice. Independence of the judiciary means independence from the government in power since judges have to provide justice not only between citizens but also between a citizen and the State. The Indian Constitution makes provision for an independent and impartial judiciary. Former Chief Justice Chandrachud opines that the independence of judiciary is the “cardinal feature” and observed that the “judiciary which is to act as a bastion of the rights and freedom of the people is given certain constitutional guarantees to safeguard the independence of judiciary”. The provision of an all-India judicial service (AIJS) on the lines of the Indian Administrative Service and the Indian Police Service was mooted soon after Independence. The provision of AIJS was included in Article 312 of the Constitution through the 42nd Amendment in 1976.

(c) To strengthen the Election Commission of India and its commissioners is the need of the hour. Suggest measures to make it more independent and impartial. (Paid)

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Online Course for Public Administration for IAS Mains

Study Notes for Public Administration Optional Mains - 100% Syllabus Covered

Test Series for Public Administration Optional

(E-Book) YOJANA MAGAZINE PDF - MAY 2021

 (E-Book) YOJANA MAGAZINE PDF - MAY 2021 

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Content Table

  • नीति आयोग संघवाद की नई परिभाषा (राजीव कुमार, उर्वशी प्रसाद, देवाशीष धर)
  • गुजरात की विकास कथा (विजय रूपाणी)
  • महाराष्ट्र साठ साल से ज्यादा का सफर (योजना टोम)
  • एक राष्ट्र- एक चुनाव (के एफ विल्फ्रेड)
  • कोविड 19 में राजकोषीय संघवाद (डॉ सज्जन एस यादव, सूरज के प्रधान)
  • कौशल विकास का बेहतर ढांचा (जूथिका पाटणकर, डॉ मनीष मिश्र)
  • संघवाद की चुनौतिया और आगे का रास्ता (समीरा सौरभ)
  • रेडियो फ्रिक्वेंसी स्पेक्ट्रम आवंटन (डॉ प्रताप सी मोहंती, डॉ करुण रावत)
  • आज़ादी का अमृत महोत्सव स्वतंत्रता के बाद मानव विकास में प्रगति (नरेश गुप्ता)
  • योजना सही विकल्प

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(Getting Started) Crash Courses - are they Effective for UPSC Preparation?



(Getting Started) Crash Courses - are they Effective for UPSC Preparation?



Crash courses have forever been sold as an instant cure to hapless aspirants. And this is not just the case for UPSC Civil Services but almost all kinds of exams in general. There are always conflicting views on whether these courses are indeed useful or not. Some upsc toppers swear by these, some openly claim that they underwent a crash course but it did nothing for them. In this article, we try and decipher whether a crash course is indeed effective for UPSC preparation.

Objectives Of A Crash Course

The first thing you need to know is the objective of the course you are about to enroll in. Largely, there are two types of crash courses –

  • Introductory – This is targeted at beginners. It is meant to give you a basic understanding of concepts and help you create an effective structure for your preparation.
  • Revision – This is a revision course, targeted at those with a decent idea of the subjects. It is meant to clarify doubts and help revise content and conclude your preparation.

If you are a beginner and enroll in a revision course, or vice versa, suffice to say, you will not find it helpful at all.

Benefits Of A UPSC Crash Course

Unending Material To Cover

Among the many reasons one enrolls for a UPSC crash course, these 2 stand out –

  1. Access to upsc curated notes – These courses usually come with summarized reading material that is excellent for a quick review. It saves you time and effort and if the course is from a reputed source, the material adds a lot of value to your preparation.
  2. Access to upsc mock tests – They uniquely allow you access to a few sectional and full tests, and you can then choose to invest in a separate test series or just use the one included in the course.

UPSC PRELIMS Online Course (GS, CSAT, Current Affairs Combo)

What A Crash Course Won’t Do For You

A crash course is in no way a substitute for self-studying or a regular classroom course. It gives you guidelines and material content at best but it cannot fully prepare you for the long-drawn journey that is UPSC and to expect that would be unwise.

Do You Need A Crash Course?

That depends on where in your UPSC journey you currently stand. 

Ask yourself these questions –

  1. Are you facing difficulty finishing the upsc syllabus?
  2. Are there certain topics with which you are having more difficulty with?
  3. Do you feel despite covering the syllabus you are unable to answer questions in previous years’ papers or mocks?

If your answers are “yes” to more than one of these questions, chances are that despite the effort you are putting in, lack of guidance is preventing you from getting results. A crash course may be ideal for you in such a scenario.

Always remember, UPSC is unpredictable to only those who do not understand what it is asking of them. It's always better to be overprepared than to find yourself at a disadvantage. Whether you choose to join a regular course, a crash course, or self-study, at the end of the day it is your mental agility and hard work that will help you succeed. You just have to choose the options best for you.

Best of Luck.

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